Thursday, December 31, 2020

Red Crosses



When I first started piecing this quilt, I didn't have a plan beyond wanting to try the pattern. It was in an older issue of a magazine and I cut it out and tucked it away in my files. A few months ago, I found the pattern again. The large squares were supposed to be single pieces of fabric, cut 8.5" on a side. 

I've been making crumb blocks in that size for the Rainbow Scrap Challenge for the last two years, and thought it would be fun to use some of those blocks for the squares. I had a ton of blue blocks, and a recent purchase of red fabric was sitting on my cutting mat. Red, white and blue always look jaunty, so I pieced it up.

In the pattern drawing, the squares take center stage, but as I stitched those red pieces in, the cross shapes are what really stood out. The quilt became Red Crosses, and whispered to me that it wanted to comfort one of my friends who is a nurse. While I've known T for many years, we aren't super close, so I kept thinking, "It's kinda weird to give a quilt to someone you haven't seen in so many years. And R/W/B is kinda rah-rah patriotic, right?" But the quilt whispered, "I think you should send me to T."


T is part of our group of motorcycle friends who live in California, and they keep in touch via Facebook. I'm not on FB, so Sean fills me in when there's news in the group. As Covid cases get worse and worse in the West, he's been telling me about how T is so tired and stressed and overworked and frustrated. She lives up in the mountains where it snows and is getting cold and dark. It sounds like 2020 is grinding away at her! The quilt stopped whispering and said out loud, "Hello? When are you going to send me there to do my work of keeping her warm and comforted?" 

So last week, I did. I shipped out Red Crosses, wondering if T would think it was really strange to get a quilt out of the blue. What if it clashes with her home? But I shouldn't have worried, because quilts just know where they are needed. T says she loves her quilt and it made her teary. And that's the very best thing for a quilter to hear!